Vehicle Reviews

Ford Mondeo - Review Of The Week

The revised fourth generation Ford Mondeo pulls out all the stops in a bid to convince British buyers that the medium-range 'D'-segment family hatch isn't a thing of the past. With tight pricing, comfort-orientated drive dynamics, the sort of cabin tech you might expect to be the preserve of the premium German marques and a sharp chassis with an all-wheel drive option, there looks to be life in the Mondeo yet.

We're looking forward to trying this revised Mondeo and we're interested to note that Ford's has slimmed down the engine choices on offer. Most customers choose a 2.0-litre EcoBlue diesel engine good for either 150PS or 190PS, both variants featuring single variable geometry turbocharger technology. The 150PS and 190PS diesels are available with Ford's Intelligent All-Wheel Drive system, which offers a seamless transition between front-wheel drive and all-wheel-drive performance to automatically enhance traction and road-holding when needed. There is also a 165PS 1.5-litre EcoBoost petrol unit.

Ford Mondeo - Review Of The Week

Buyers can alternatively opt for a Mondeo Hybrid. Unlike the hybrid option you get in a rival Volkswagen Passat, this set-up isn't one of the pricey plug-in sort, which means you don't get astonishing all-electric style fuel returns - but then you do without the Passat's outlandish asking price too. Instead, a Mondeo Hybrid has the more conventional type of petrol/electric set-up you'd find in a slightly cheaper but smaller and less powerful rival like Toyota's Prius where the engine cuts in and out to assist electric propulsion as and when required. In the Ford's case, that powerplant is a 187PS 2.0-litre unit whose efforts are supplemented by a 88kW electric motor driving the front wheels. There's another electric motor for regenerative charging only and a lithium-ion battery pack with an output of 35kW and a capacity of 1.4 kWh, the whole set-up operating via the kind of CVT auto gearbox that's a normal feature in hybrids of this sort.

If there's one thing that's defined the Mondeo's design, it's that it's become bigger and more expensive-looking with each passing generation. This one doesn't divert from that precedent. The front gets Ford's Aston Martin lookalike grille with laser-cut headlamps and a power dome bonnet, while the fuselage is far more sculptured and sophisticated in its design than its immediate predecessor. Ford calls the roofline 'a sports coupe profile' which might be pushing it a bit, but it's a handsome thing. The estate version incorporates a retractable panoramic glass roof for the wagon bodystyle.

And in summary? Well, for most of its customers most of the time, the fourth generation version of Ford's 'one world' medium range family car is a better bet than ever in this improved guise. Today, a car of this kind must be a more luxurious and more technologically-advanced thing, so this Mondeo is. You could pay more than twice as much for something with a prestigious German badge and still fail to match this car's refinement and much of the kind of high-tech kit that really sets this Ford apart from slightly cheaper rivals like Vauxhall's Insignia. And it's certainly a closer match and arguably a more interesting option in this sector than Volkswagen's classy eight generation Passat. In short, this is a model rejuvenated. It's worth your attention.

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