Vehicle Comparisons

SEAT Ateca

SEAT Ateca

SEAT's Ateca looks a strong proposition in the family Crossover segment. It's well priced, sharply-styled and offers the sporty feel the sector seems to want. In fact, you wonder why it took the Spanish brand so long to bring us a car like this.

SEAT promises a line-up of petrol and diesel engines ranging in power from 115 to 190PS - expect a couple of petrol units and three diesels. The Ateca delivers a line-up of petrol and diesel engines ranging in power from 115 to 190PS, with the initial range built around three petrol units and three diesels. Things kick off with a 1.0-litre TSI 115PS Ecomotive petrol variant that sits just below a 150PS 1.4-litre TSI EcoTSI option, plus there's a 2.0 TSI 190PS powerplant. Diesel models start with the 1.6-litre TDI 115PS derivative, plus there are also 150 and 190PS versions of the Volkswagen Group's familiar 2.0-litre TDI diesel. 2.0 TDI 150PS buyers get the option of DSG auto transmission and '4Drive' 4WD, but if you go for the top 190PS variant, you have to have both.

We expect the 2.0 TDI diesel engine to be the one many buyers will target and it's a strong engine that pulls willingly from low speeds, though isn't the most refined powerplant of its kind. The Ateca rides firmly - in line with SEAT's preference to make it 'sporty': that's something potential buyers will need to like. The lofty driving position will please them, as will the way that all the major controls are clustered around you. Not so good are the thick, angled C-pillars that block rear three-quarter vision. An optional park assist system and birds-eye camera help with tight spaces.

Under skin, the Ateca sits on the same MQB platform as its more conventional Leon stablemate and uses most of the same mechanicals found in Volkswagen's very similar Tiguan model. Inside, it's also very similar to the Leon - which is no bad thing. The fit and finish is of high quality, though the plastics get scratchier the farther down you go.

In the front, there's decent room for two adults on supportive seats. It's the same in the back, though it's disappointing to find that the rear seats don't slide or recline like they do in the latest Tiguan. The boot's a bit smaller than that pricier Volkswagen rival model too, though will easily swallow a couple of big cases and a pushchair. You access it via a tailgate offering the option of power operation: it's one of those you can activate by waving your foot beneath the bumper.

Ateca's pricing starts from around £18,000 and there's a choice of three trim levels - 'S', 'SE' and range-topping 'Xcellence', a variant which should come in at under £30,000.The extensive array of technology options extends from full-LED headlights to a broad portfolio of assistance systems, like an innovative Traffic Jam Assist set-up and an Emergency Assist feature, to a package of latest-generation infotainment systems with eight-inch touchscreens and Full Link connectivity.

The infotainment screen functions with MirrorLink and Apple CarPlay connectivity and the system will also read out new text, Twitter and Facebook messages and let you dictate a reply. It's even got the capability to let you set up your own screen gestures to shortcut to your most popular commands.

SEAT's first effort in this segment looks to have been worth waiting for. The Ateca isn't quite the size of a Tiguan - but then it's much more affordable. And there's a dash of spirit and character here that we think potential customers will like.

In summary, if you were just about to buy a Nissan Qashqai or something similar, an Ateca is certainly worth a look.

Click here to find out more about our SEAT Ateca range
Nissan Qashqai

Nissan Qashqai

These days, the Nissan Qashqai is sleeker, feels more expensive inside and offers some of the most sophisticated electronic safety technology in the mid-sized Crossover segment. Improvements to the 1.5-litre dCi diesel that most customers choose have enhanced its appeal. Plus as before, there's also a 1.6-litre diesel and two petrol engines, front or all wheel drive and manual or Xtronic automatic transmissions. There's a reason why this Nissan is sunch a hugely popular contender in yhe mid-sized SUV segment.

On the face of things, not much has changed on this Qashqai in recent years in terms of its drive dynamics, though Nissan insists that under the skin, modifications to the suspension, damping and steering systems have resulted in a more refined on-the-road experience, plus refinement's better too. As before, buyers can choose between front and four-wheel drive versions. The front-wheel drive cars get a cheaper torsion beam rear suspension set-up, while those with All-Mode 4x4 get a more sophisticated independent rear suspension. The calibration has been performed in Europe to suit European tastes. Whether you choose front or rear wheel drive, the Qashqai benefits from Active Trace Control which monitors the behaviour and trajectory of the car, and applies subtle braking to deliver a function similar to a Limited Slip Differential, providing the best traction and the least understeer. There's also a dual mode steering system which changes the weighting of the electrically-assisted rack when you select the Sport setting.

As ever, buyers get the choice of two downsized petrol engines and two turbodiesels. The petrol units comprise an 115 PS 1.2-litre DIG-T powerplant that drives through a six-speed manual box or a 1.6-litre 163PS DIG-T engine. Most customers will doubtless be drawn to the diesels, with the 1.5-litre unit easily the most popular. In recent times, it's been upgraded from 110 to 115PS and while torque remains rated at 260Nm, the powerplant now features a new overboost function for easier overtaking. The alternative diesel continues to be the minority-interest 1.6-litre 130hp dCi unit, which is the one you'll need in the unlikely event that you want your Qashqai with 4WD. This engine is also sold with the Xtronic transmission, a stepped CVT gearbox.

The package of styling updates that Nissan introduced for Qashqai buyers in 2017 smartened this second generation design up considerably and included a completely revised front end incorporating the latest Nissan 'V-motion' grille. The headlamps were also revised with a classier version of the 'boomerang' Daytime Running Light signature. At the rear, the car's instantly recognisable 'boomerang' light motif is extended across the whole lamp, and includes a contemporary 3D lens effect to enhance the signature shape.

If you haven't tried a Qashqai since this second generation version was launched in 2014, you'll notioce quite a few changes in the cabin too, where an improved layout, higher-quality materials and more advanced technology feature. The 'NissanConnect' infotainment system features a more intuitive user interface and there's a smarter D-shaped multi-function steering wheel with premium satin-chrome inserts. It features a four-way controller for the combimeter display, for easier use and less 'eyes off the road' time.

The range-topping Tekna+ grade includes supportive seats trimmed in high-quality soft nappa leather and a popular option for music fans is a BOSE seven-speaker premium sound system. Practicality is as good as ever, with reasonable space in the back and decent headroom thanks to a relatively low seat height in the back. Boot space is 430-litres and load space flexibility is enhanced by a dual-floor system designed to provide a flexible and versatile load space.

In summary, we think Nissan has judged this one perfectly. Time and again the company has been correct in predicting customer demand and having a product right there. That's not about to change.

It's worth noting that of all the Qashqai variants that are being offered to the UK public, only two feature all-wheel drive. This is a car that no longer purports to be anything remotely off-road at all. Instead, it's a model that plugs in to what buyers want, offering lifestyle looks, cutting-edge technology and an efficient ownership proposition. Even in these hard times, Nissan realises that a new car purchase needs to come with a dose of feel-good factor - perhaps now more than ever in fact. Given that reality, this Qashqai looks set to continue to cash in.

Click here to find out more about our Nissan Qashqai range
Skoda Karoq

Skoda Karoq

Skoda is getting serious about SUVs. Building on the success of its large, 7-seat Kodiaq crossover, it brings up this only slightly smaller Qashqai-sized Karoq model. It gets all the latest Volkswagen Group technology, including a hi-tech MQB chassis and cutting-edge safety and infotainment features. Everything in fact, that you'd want from a modern family-sized SUV of this kind.

Under the skin, this Skoda uses much the same MQB chassis as you'll find in the Volkswagen Group's rival SEAT Ateca and the Volkswagen T-Roc. The set-up with this Karoq is deliberately more comfort-orientated than it is in the Ateca. The various powerplants on offer are all familiar from other Volkswagen Group models. There are initially four turbo-charged direct injection engine options - two TSI petrols (with 1.0 and 1.5-litre variants) and two diesel engines (a 1.6 and a 150PS 2.0-litre unit). All the drivetrains can be ordered with a 6-speed manual gearbox or 7-speed DSG auto transmission. The 1.5 TSI petrol variant uses cylinder deactivation for an exemplary combination of performance and efficiency.

Only the top 2.0 TDI 150PS diesel variant is available with 4WD; in fact you have to have AWD with this flagship version. This derivative is also fitted with a special 'Off Road' mode and hill descent control so that you can more easily slither down slippery slopes. In general though, this Skoda's limited ground clearance makes testing off road forays fairly inadvisable. The Karoq is much happier being used for tarmac use and an option worth considering here is the 'DCC' 'Dynamic Chassis Control' adaptive damping system that can considerably improve the ride over poor surfaces. It works through the settings of the standard 'Driving Mode Select' system.

The Karoq is a slightly bigger car than its Yeti predecessor and much better able to square up to the market-leading Nissan Qashqai in the family-sized part of the volume Crossover SUV sector. This Skoda certainly has a much bigger boot than its Japanese rival, with 521-litres of cargo space, extendable to 1,630-litres if you fold forward VarioFlex middle bench made up of three separate seats that can, if required, be taken out completely. If you do that, a van-like capacity of up to 1,810-litres is freed up.

View the car in profile and the longer-than-average wheelbase by class standards is very evident and the side aesthetics are also characterised by short overhangs and a sloping roofline that's visually extended by a contour in the D-pillar. At the front, the headlights flanking the distinctive grille can optionally be ordered with full-LED beams. Inside, for the first time in a Skoda, a digital instrument panel is being offered. And, as usual, there are a range of 'Simply Clever' features, including an electrically-retractable tow bar. And a 'Virtual Pedal' option that allows you to open the power-operated tailgate with a wave of your foot beneath the bumper.

All the things that made the old Yeti so appealing remain with this Karoq model. It's spacious, safe, drives well, has a cool but understated image and is affordable to run. In short, what we have here is a class act in a market full of try-hard rivals and a car that strikes an appealing chord between practicality, quality and fashion.

True, some of the rivals it has to face are larger, more hi-tech or more efficient. Most of them are pricier too though and it's that very affordability that'll keep this Skoda in the frame for customers who want a more interesting and flexible alternative to yet another Qashqai clone in this class. It's a car that transcends lifestyle snobbery. A family car that doesn't shout 'family'. And a Crossover you could be genuinely pleased to own.

Click here to find out more about our Skoda Karoq range